Cityparkdog

clioancientart:

 Roman Pottery Oil Lamp with Head of Jupiter 
Link: http://www.clioancientart.com/catalog/i143.html
CULTURE / REGION OF ORIGIN: Roman Empire.DATE: Late 1st – 2nd Century ADDIMENSIONS: 10 cm (3.0 in.) long including handle; 7.5 cm (2.9 in.) wide.
 DESCRIPTION: Intact. A mold-made Roman pottery oil lamp of very fine clay covered in a well preserved red slip. The discus is decorated with a bold image in rather high relief of Jupiter in about three-quarters angle, with well defined facial features and unruly hair and beard. One large and one small filling hole occupy the spaces to either side of Jupiter’s beard. The shoulder is decorated with sixteen shield-like medallions and separated from the discus by a double groove. The heart-shaped body protrudes from the body, while the loop handle is decorated with a double groove. The flat base is defined by a single groove. Beneath one shoulder is a faint pencil mark possibly reading “A25”. Accompanied by an old hand written tag reading; “Roman oil lamp round body with relief decoration of head of Hercules. Rare design in “as made” Ex Ousterman colln, ex Pickard. Late 1st Cent AD. 98mm”MPROVENANCE: Formerly in a Welsh private collection formed between the 1970s and 2008.PUBLISHED: Bonhams, London, ANTIQUITIES, 29 April, 2009, part of Lot #308, listed and illustrated on Page 175. 
clioancientart:

 Roman Pottery Oil Lamp with Head of Jupiter 
Link: http://www.clioancientart.com/catalog/i143.html
CULTURE / REGION OF ORIGIN: Roman Empire.DATE: Late 1st – 2nd Century ADDIMENSIONS: 10 cm (3.0 in.) long including handle; 7.5 cm (2.9 in.) wide.
 DESCRIPTION: Intact. A mold-made Roman pottery oil lamp of very fine clay covered in a well preserved red slip. The discus is decorated with a bold image in rather high relief of Jupiter in about three-quarters angle, with well defined facial features and unruly hair and beard. One large and one small filling hole occupy the spaces to either side of Jupiter’s beard. The shoulder is decorated with sixteen shield-like medallions and separated from the discus by a double groove. The heart-shaped body protrudes from the body, while the loop handle is decorated with a double groove. The flat base is defined by a single groove. Beneath one shoulder is a faint pencil mark possibly reading “A25”. Accompanied by an old hand written tag reading; “Roman oil lamp round body with relief decoration of head of Hercules. Rare design in “as made” Ex Ousterman colln, ex Pickard. Late 1st Cent AD. 98mm”MPROVENANCE: Formerly in a Welsh private collection formed between the 1970s and 2008.PUBLISHED: Bonhams, London, ANTIQUITIES, 29 April, 2009, part of Lot #308, listed and illustrated on Page 175.

clioancientart:

Roman Pottery Oil Lamp with Head of Jupiter

Link: http://www.clioancientart.com/catalog/i143.html

CULTURE / REGION OF ORIGIN: Roman Empire.
DATE: Late 1st – 2nd Century AD
DIMENSIONS: 10 cm (3.0 in.) long including handle; 7.5 cm (2.9 in.) wide.

DESCRIPTION: Intact. A mold-made Roman pottery oil lamp of very fine clay covered in a well preserved red slip. The discus is decorated with a bold image in rather high relief of Jupiter in about three-quarters angle, with well defined facial features and unruly hair and beard. One large and one small filling hole occupy the spaces to either side of Jupiter’s beard. The shoulder is decorated with sixteen shield-like medallions and separated from the discus by a double groove. The heart-shaped body protrudes from the body, while the loop handle is decorated with a double groove. The flat base is defined by a single groove. Beneath one shoulder is a faint pencil mark possibly reading “A25”. Accompanied by an old hand written tag reading; “Roman oil lamp round body with relief decoration of head of Hercules. Rare design in “as made” Ex Ousterman colln, ex Pickard. Late 1st Cent AD. 98mm”M
PROVENANCE: Formerly in a Welsh private collection formed between the 1970s and 2008.
PUBLISHED: Bonhams, London, ANTIQUITIES, 29 April, 2009, part of Lot #308, listed and illustrated on Page 175.


weetweetie:

Gerardus Mercator’s first map
The first map that the great cartographer published himself (at age 25) was a map of Palestine, in 1537: Terra Sanctae descriptio ad utriusque testamente intelligentiam (“A description of the Holy Land for understanding both testaments”). It aimed to help people in their Bible studies, a Protestant notion that may have been part of what aroused the suspicions of the authorities and caused his seven months prison sentence. Above a (low resolution) photograph of a map facsimile held at the Istituto Geografico Militare in Firenze, Italy, from an original at the Communal Library of Perugia, Italy.
Below that a much better map produced later on, by Mercator and another renowned Dutch cartographer, Jodocus Hondius. Terra Sancta que in Terra Promissionis ol: Palestina. For sale in antique map shops. Note “Hierusalem” at 32 N, 69 E… they use funny longitudes.
Note that in the first map, West is up; in the second, East is up. At the time the area was part of the Ottoman empire.
weetweetie:

Gerardus Mercator’s first map
The first map that the great cartographer published himself (at age 25) was a map of Palestine, in 1537: Terra Sanctae descriptio ad utriusque testamente intelligentiam (“A description of the Holy Land for understanding both testaments”). It aimed to help people in their Bible studies, a Protestant notion that may have been part of what aroused the suspicions of the authorities and caused his seven months prison sentence. Above a (low resolution) photograph of a map facsimile held at the Istituto Geografico Militare in Firenze, Italy, from an original at the Communal Library of Perugia, Italy.
Below that a much better map produced later on, by Mercator and another renowned Dutch cartographer, Jodocus Hondius. Terra Sancta que in Terra Promissionis ol: Palestina. For sale in antique map shops. Note “Hierusalem” at 32 N, 69 E… they use funny longitudes.
Note that in the first map, West is up; in the second, East is up. At the time the area was part of the Ottoman empire.

weetweetie:

Gerardus Mercator’s first map

The first map that the great cartographer published himself (at age 25) was a map of Palestine, in 1537: Terra Sanctae descriptio ad utriusque testamente intelligentiam (“A description of the Holy Land for understanding both testaments”). It aimed to help people in their Bible studies, a Protestant notion that may have been part of what aroused the suspicions of the authorities and caused his seven months prison sentence. Above a (low resolution) photograph of a map facsimile held at the Istituto Geografico Militare in Firenze, Italy, from an original at the Communal Library of Perugia, Italy.

Below that a much better map produced later on, by Mercator and another renowned Dutch cartographer, Jodocus Hondius. Terra Sancta que in Terra Promissionis ol: Palestina. For sale in antique map shops. Note “Hierusalem” at 32 N, 69 E… they use funny longitudes.

Note that in the first map, West is up; in the second, East is up. At the time the area was part of the Ottoman empire.